Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (The New Middle Ages)

by Mary Dockray-Miller

Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan

Written in English
Cover of: Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (The New Middle Ages) | Mary Dockray-Miller
Published: Pages: 176 Downloads: 821
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Subjects:

  • Great Britain - History,
  • Parent And Child,
  • Social Science,
  • History - General History,
  • History: World,
  • Europe - Great Britain - General,
  • Parenting - Motherhood,
  • Sociology - Marriage & Family,
  • History / Medieval,
  • England,
  • History,
  • Motherhood,
  • Mothers,
  • Mothers in literature,
  • To 1500
The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages176
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9342155M
ISBN 100312227213
ISBN 109780312227210

This chapter discusses the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle that covers the history of England from the time of the earliest English invaders down to ad It notes that the work begins even earlier, with the record of Caesar's invasion of Britain in 60 bc, followed (as in Versions A and B for instance) by a continuous numbering of years by ad reckoning from the birth of Christ (ad I) onwards. Anglo is a prefix indicating a relation to, or descent from, the Angles, England, English culture, the English people or the English language, such as in the term Anglo-Saxon is often used alone, somewhat loosely, to refer to people of British Isles descent in the North America, the Caribbean, South Africa, Namibia, Australia, and New Zealand. The word pagan is a Latin term that was used by Christians in Anglo-Saxon England to designate non-Christians. In Old English, the vernacular language of Anglo-Saxon England, the equivalent term was hæðen ("heathen"), a word that was cognate to the Old Norse heiðinn, both of which may derive from a Gothic word, haiþno. Both pagan and heathen were terms that carried pejorative overtones. Oct 2, - The Anglo-Saxon epic, Beowulf, tells of a Geat prince who travels to rid the Danes of a troll-like monster haunting their king's mead hall. He then slays the creature's vengeful mother. Many years later, he fights a dragon roused by greed. The version we know is from England, but Beowulf and his deeds are mentioned in Hrolf Kraki's Saga; which makes him firmly part of the body of pins.

Thank you. That was the best, concise explanation of the origin of Anglo Saxon origin I have come across.I never realized the exact origin of those people but you have explained it well and I plan to print it out for future reference. Roberta B. on Ap am. The Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms. Julius Caesar led the first Roman invasion of England in 55 BCE, but it wasn’t until 43 CE, under the Emperor Claudius, that a successful invasion brought Britain under Rome’s control as a colony. Roman rule over Britain lasted for more than three hundred years. Michael Wood has produced a number of books and documentaries on Anglo-Saxon England. For more on early Medieval warfare, subscribe to History of War for as little as £ All About History is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Anglo-Saxon kings issued many laws codes, Anglo-Saxon law was fundamentally customary law. Also the law during that period was no only Anglo-Saxon law, but Viking law, which was enforced in the Danelaw. We know from other sources that there were at least five forms of public court in Anglo-Saxon England, in addition to the local baronial courts.

expectations for women, in the Anglo-Saxon version Judith is praised for her actions and rewarded with a portion of the spoils. Not all women who step outside their gender roles are similarly rewarded. In contrast to Judith is Grendel's Mother, from the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf. Spurred by the death of her son. - Explore Donna Doyle's board "Old English Literature/ Anglo-Saxon Period/Medieval Period" on Pinterest. See more ideas about anglo saxon, saxon, medieval period pins. Genealogy profile for Æthelberht. Share your family tree and photos with the people you know and love. Build your family tree online ; Share photos and videos.   Two generations of Danish Vikings then reigned in England while the children of former Anglo-Saxon rulers hid with relatives in Europe. But one royal mother .

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (The New Middle Ages) by Mary Dockray-Miller Download PDF EPUB FB2

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children.

Mary Dockray-Miller casts a maternal eye on Bede, the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, and Beowulf to reveal mothers Cited by: Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children.

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Digital. Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children.

Mary Dockray-Miller casts a maternal eye on Bede, the. Get this from a library. Motherhood and mothering in Anglo-Saxon England. [Mary Dockray-Miller] -- "Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own system to.

Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (The New Middle Ages) Mary Dockray-Miller Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England sifts through the historical evidence to describe and analyze a world of violence and intrigue, where mothers needed to devise their own systems to protect, nurture, and teach their children.

The book tells the history of women from the She-Wolves of Anglo Saxon England to the women of the high medieval England, this book is an interesting and informative read. flag 1 like Like see review.

medieval views on sex, marriage and motherhood; /5(35). Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England. CrossRef; Google Scholar; Anderson, T Using spatial epidemiology to investigate skeletal evidence for malaria in Anglo-Saxon England (AD ).

American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol.Issue. 2, p. This is the first book to make a comprehensive study of. My new book, Women of Power in Anglo-Saxon England, features the mothers, wives and daughters of the Anglo-Saxon kings, as well as a number of influential and powerful noblewomen, and not a few nuns and abbesses.

What struck me was that from as early as the seventh century and across all these groups of women, levels of literacy were high.

Bertha was the daughter of the. Stefanie Wilder-Taylor, an American author, stand-up comic and mother was at the forefront of the boozy mother wave with her blog, Make Mine a Double: Tales of Twins and Tequila and her book.

Mothers' Night. The clearest evidence we have for veneration of The Mothers in Anglo-Saxon England is from Bede. His history of the English people, written in aboutfamously refers to a pre-Christian seasonal winter custom as Modranech 'the Mother's Night'.

We refer to. Alfred, in the company of his brothers, was with their mother when she produced a book of English poetry.

Alfred was fascinated by the illuminated capital initial on the first page of the volume. Osburh told the children the first one who could come to her and recite the poetry in the book would be given the book.

Mary Dockray-Miller (born ) is an American scholar of early medieval England, best known for her work on gender in the pre-Conquest has published on female saints, on Beowulf, and on religious women. She teaches at Lesley University, where she is professor of English.

Dockray-Miller is the author of Motherhood and Mothering in Anglo-Saxon England (St. Martin's Press,   Annie Whitehead graduated in history having specialised in the ‘Dark Ages’ and is a member of the Royal Historical ’s written three books about early medieval Mercia, the ancient Anglo-Saxon kingdom of the Midlands.

The first, To Be a Queen, tells the story of Alfred the Great’s daughter, and was long-listed for the Historical Novelist Society’s Indie Book of the Year   With over six hundred and fifty pages, this book chronicles the struggles of Queen Emma "Elgifu" of England.

This story goes on for what seems like forever (now I understand the naming of the book FOREVER QUEEN!) and then on the last page you feel like the balls been dropped/5().

The people who would become the Anglo-Saxons first migrated to England in the fifth century. At that time they were pagans, believing in many gods. However, starting around A.D., the Anglo-Saxons began converting to Christianity.

The strength of mother-child bonds are further illustrated by the close relationship between Denver and Sethe, upon which Paul D intrudes.

But, within the novel, the strength of motherhood is constantly pitted against the horrors of slavery. In a number of ways, slavery simply does not allow for motherhood.

From the impact of the first monasteries in the seventh century, to the emergence of the local parochial system five hundred years later, the Church was a force for change in Anglo-Saxon society.

It shaped culture and ideas, social and economic behaviour, and the organization of landscape and settlement. This book traces how the widespread foundation of monastic sites ('minsters') during. Edgar the Aethling (or Edgar the Ætheling, c.

– c. ) was a claimant to the throne of England in after Edward the Confessor died. Edgar was a popular choice among the English, because he was English and a grandson of Edmund Ironside.

Edgar was born in Hungary because his father was in exile there. When Edgar was five, his father, Edward the Exile returned to England from Hungary. Mōdraniht or Modranicht (Old English "Night of the Mothers" or "Mothers' Night") was an event held at what is now Christmas Eve by the Anglo-Saxon event is attested by the medieval English historian Bede in his eighth-century Latin work De temporum has been suggested that sacrifices may have occurred during this event.

Scholars have proposed connections between the Anglo. The mandate of the Journal of the Motherhood Initiative for Research and Community Involvement is to publish the most current, high quality scholarship on mothering-motherhood and to ensure that this scholarship considers motherhood in an international context and from a multitude of perspectives including differences of class, race, sexuality.

However, infancy, the pregnant body and motherhood continue to be marginalised. This book will focus on the mother-infant relationship and the variable constructions of this dyad across cultures, including conceptualisations of the pregnant body, the beginnings of life, and implications for health.

First, it will examine motherhood as a social, historical, and literary construct. That is, we will discuss how motherhood was defined in a variety of historical cultures: the work assigned to or expected of mothers; the ideal of the “good mother”; the relationship between mothers and fathers; and the legal position of mothers.

The list of variables that are included in the meta-regressions and that serve as “candidate” variables for explaining heterogeneity in the estimates of the motherhood wage penalty is presented in Table of the variables are expressed as dummy variables equal to one if a given control variable (denoted as Z k in equation 3) was omitted in the original estimation, and zero otherwise.

Grendel’s mother, like her son, is a mysterious humanoid creature. She enters the poem as an “avenger” (l), seeking redress for the death of her son at Beowulf’s hands.

For this reason, some readers have seen Grendel’s mother as an embodiment of ancient Northern European society’s tendency toward unending blood-feuds. As well as being involved in Turned Upside Down, Annie has also had two nonfiction books published.

Mercia: The Rise and Fall of a Kingdom (Amberley Books) will be published in paperback edition on October 15th,while her most recent release, Women of Power in Anglo-Saxon England (Pen & Sword Books) is available in hardback and e-book. Anne Beauchamp. Anne Beauchamp was the mother of Anne Neville (the Princess of Wales, when married to Henry VI's heir, and later Queen of England in her marriage to Richard III) and Isabel Neville (married to George, Duke of Clarence, who attempted for a time to become king of England).

Anne Beauchamp's husband, Richard Neville, the 16th Earl of Warwick, was famous for his. Highly recommended for anyone interested in the Anglo-Saxon period. NetGalley, Frances Owen.

Women of Power in Anglo-Saxon England brings to life the women of the Anglo-Saxon period with vivid clarity. It is a remarkable study of the lives of women of the period - known and unknown - and their impact on : £   Anglo-Saxon England, Part III 14 Sep 14 Sep / Great Books Guy After the death of Alfred The Great, his bloodline would produce a series of warrior kings that would conquer the Danes and dominate the British isle.

A year after becoming king, he had a sister married to Sihtric, the Viking King of York. Sihtric died a year later, and Athelstan took the chance to capture Northumbria. This was a bold move, and made him the king of a larger territory than any Anglo-Saxon king before him, roughly equivalent to modern England, except for Cornwall.

Annie has written three novels set in Anglo-Saxon England. To Be A Queen tells the story of Æthelflæd, Lady of the the Kingmaker is set in the turbulent tenth century where deaths of kings and civil war dictated politics, while Cometh the Hour tells the story of Penda, the pagan king of Mercia.

All have received IndieBRAG Gold Medallions and Chill with a Book awards.Buy Motherhood in Literature and Culture: Interdisciplinary Perspectives from Europe (Routledge Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Literature) 1 by Rye, Gill, Browne, Victoria, Giorgio, Adalgisa, Jeremiah, Emily, Lee Six, Abigail (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible s: 1.Beowulf is the best known and most closely studied literary work surviving from Anglo-Saxon England, and the modern reader is faced with a bewildering number and variety of interpretations about such basic matters as the date, provenance, and significance of the poem.

A Critical Companion to Beowulf addresses these and other issues, reviewing and synthesising previous scholarship, as well as.